where do you fish not a destination....

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Night_Browns
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Re: where do you fish not a destination....

Post by Night_Browns » Mon Nov 03, 2014 2:17 pm

Eperous, please excuse my warped sense of humor, but mathematically speaking, puffy clouds, clear mountain brooks, moss covered rocks, and pretty butterflies are pretty much unavoidable, so I just accept that, and do my best to endure it. :-)

Ted Patlen, it's not that awfully uncommon for me to get skunked for a day, and sometimes it happens for two days running. The longer I fish without so much as a bite, the bigger my smile becomes. Over time I have developed absolute faith in my methodology, so I know that each cast that I make is just one cast closer to success. In short, going hours without a bite makes my heart race and adds to the enjoyment, because I know that It's overdue. Being analytical is not a 'choice' for me. In order for me to avoid looking at fishing as being an engineering problem, I would have to INTENTIONALLY IGNORE the truth of mathematics. That would be impossible for me to do over any sustained period of time, because the math works.

I am somehow able to ignore the fact that going to the grocery store and buying fish and eating them would be much more logical, so perhaps there is some hope for me after all. :-D
I'm an experienced practitioner of the mystical art of night fishing for large browns. I don't normally catch many small fish.

I fish where you fish, you're just not there when I am. ;-)

vtflyfish
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Re: where do you fish not a destination....

Post by vtflyfish » Mon Nov 03, 2014 5:17 pm

"Every wind in the river
Sure 'nuff makes its own way down to the sea"
Which some will recognize as a lyric from the great bluesman Taj Mahal.

I was born with wanderlust in my heart and have been exploring from a young age, always wondering what the next bend holds. And so that journey has brought me to quiet waters in the most remote places where I'm lucky to seldom see another fisher, let alone one with a fly rod. Ponds, lakes, stillwaters have taught me new lessons, introduced me to much larger fish and shown me a whole new ecology to understand and get my head around.

I've been lucky enough to fish for Cutts and Goldens deep in Wyoming's Wind River Range and monster Rainbows in Montana but my favorite place of all is the Adirondacks I can see from my office window. There are hundreds of ponds, a lifetime worth of brookie fishing, and I haven't fished even half of them yet. That said, I probably have a bead on most of the better ones.

Fishing good ponds does not translate into easy days or many fish. Brookies sulk and brood, feeding irregularly in some of the better ponds and possibly not showing themselves for days. These are places where going a while without that sharp tug only increases the tension and one's resolve to crack the problem. And so I persist in a pattern of exploring the new and returning to the difficult. May it never end.

The new guy
Oscar Wilde: Work is the curse of the drinking class.

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Eperous
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Re: where do you fish not a destination....

Post by Eperous » Mon Nov 03, 2014 8:20 pm

vtflyfish wrote:... Fishing good ponds does not translate into easy days or many fish. Brookies sulk and brood, feeding irregularly in some of the better ponds and possibly not showing themselves for days. These are places where going a while without that sharp tug only increases the tension and one's resolve to crack the problem. And so I persist in a pattern of exploring the new and returning to the difficult. May it never end. ...
Kudos to you, I've been there myself...

Ed

andre
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Re: where do you fish not a destination....

Post by andre » Tue Nov 04, 2014 10:11 am

I can spend hours on one fish and don't move around all that much. Since I fish bamboo I very rarely fish anything but dry flies and maybe a dropper. 90% of actually fishing for me is the rise, landing the fish has little importance, in fact it gets in the way of me fishing to the next rise. I will fish where the fish are but of course wish there was no one else around but maybe a few good friends. (if i have that many) I may sound like a purist but believe me I'm not, if fish were rising in a septic tank I would be the first one there. Hate to leave fish to look for fish so hence not moving if fish are present. Greatly enjoy the beauty, mountains, water around my knees and all that but for me it about the fish or I would just hike. Yes I am an enigma to my self and again maybe a few friends.

Andre

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quashnet
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Re: where do you fish not a destination....

Post by quashnet » Tue Nov 04, 2014 12:40 pm

I have enjoyed fishing with human companions, but most of my fishing is done alone so that I can have conversations with the landscape, rather than with people. I like to consider how the geological history of thousands of years ago, and human choices of hundreds of years ago, impact the fishing I'm doing today. Much of my fishing in eastern Massachusetts is done in low-gradient trout streams of an outwash plain formed 11,000 years ago by a retreating glacier. The geology of the Catskills creates a very different freestone, higher-gradient, lower-productivity river, and it's enjoyable for me to think these things through while turning over rocks at the water's edge to see what's up with the stoneflies. It was very odd some years ago to fish trout streams in the Driftless region of Wisconsin, an area that was never scraped by a glacier: the water goes wherever it wants! I look at signs of human use - old rock walls running through New England woods, indicating sheep pens and grassy meadows of 150 years ago, or century-old cranberry bog dams collapsing into the brook trout streams of Cape Cod. I look at plant successions from the edge of the stream on up into the woods and think about the kinds of terrestrial insects likely thereby to find their way into the river. Similar musings occupy my thoughts as time passes, waiting for a trout to rise.
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ewpeper
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Re: where do you fish not a destination....

Post by ewpeper » Tue Nov 04, 2014 1:55 pm

andre wrote:I can spend hours on one fish and don't move around all that much. Since I fish bamboo I very rarely fish anything but dry flies and maybe a dropper. 90% of actually fishing for me is the rise, landing the fish has little importance, in fact it gets in the way of me fishing to the next rise. I will fish where the fish are but of course wish there was no one else around but maybe a few good friends. (if i have that many) I may sound like a purist but believe me I'm not, if fish were rising in a septic tank I would be the first one there. Hate to leave fish to look for fish so hence not moving if fish are present. Greatly enjoy the beauty, mountains, water around my knees and all that but for me it about the fish or I would just hike. Yes I am an enigma to my self and again maybe a few friends.
Andre
I laughed when I read this, Andre . . . because I could have written it about myself!! Each and every thought of it. (Altho' I'm grateful trout don't rise in septic tanks.)

Example: The first time I ever fished with Gary LaFontaine (ca 1982 or so), we went to the Big Hole. We walked upstream a short distance, and I spotted a riser and pointed it out to Gary. He said "Go for it.", and I started casting. I didn't see him -- not even at a distance -- for another hour (It took me almost that long to get a take.), and by that time Gary was at least 3/4 of a mile above me.

I cannot leave a riser. Gary'd make a couple of casts, and if the fish didn't take he'd move on. From that point on, the only times we ever shared the same water was if we shared a single rod on a small stream or were using a boat. :)

Eric
A mountain is a fact -- a trout is a moment of beauty known only to men who seek them.
Al McClane in his Introduction to The Practical Fly Fisherman . . . often erroneously attributed to Arnold Gingrich

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gt05254
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Re: where do you fish not a destination....

Post by gt05254 » Tue Nov 04, 2014 6:18 pm

I swing flies for atlantic salmon. I put in about 2 months this year on the Miramichi and its tributaries (never fished for trout at home once). Usually fish 8 hours per day. Have had weeks in years past where I never ticked a fish. This year, it was tough fishing. But I hooked salmon. When it was said there were no fish in the river. One thing is for sure, if your eyes are on your computer screen, reading fishing reports, and not on the river as your fly swings across, you are probably not going to hook a fish. Even in the worst of times, my mind thinks "this is the swing" every cast I make. Add friends and camp life...what could be better?
Gary

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Eperous
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Re: where do you fish not a destination....

Post by Eperous » Tue Nov 04, 2014 6:42 pm

ewpeper wrote: ... I cannot leave a riser. Gary'd make a couple of casts, and if the fish didn't take he'd move on. ...
Very interesting comment, and just maybe mine now will take this thread in a slightly different direction... :o

IF --- and this is a BIG if--- angler success is measured by trout, rather than the total experience, and I am not saying it is or should be... than consider the following on one Catskill watershed...

When I wander the lower Neversink, below NYC's dam, I measure a successful outing as one where I catch one--- or more--- 16" browns or larger... many a day I might walk a mile or two just looking for a single rising fish--- probably selectively feeding--- to cast at... than there are rainy, overcast days I don't worry about rising trout, but pound this mostly crystal clear tailwater with small streamers and thin bucktails seeking out that 16", or better, brown... hoping to conclude a successful outing, as measured by the "trout standard"...

Now, when I wander the waters of Theodore Gordon, Ed Hewitt, Len Wright, John Burroughs, and others... the West and East Branches of the Neversink above NYC's water supply reservoir, where trout tend to be small--- 9 inches and less--- mostly all wild, mostly brook trout... than I measure success by "the number" of trout I catch--- if I use the trout standard...

For the most part, I can't see saying I had a successful day when I caught 1, or 2, 6" brook trout where dozens upon dozen reside above the reservoir; or a 9" brown where trout 20" and better are looking to eat that fish below the reservoir...

I guess the point I'm trying to make that might have gotten lost in the text above is, sometimes I invest lots of time trying for one good fish, and sometimes I move along the stream like a hungry vacuum cleaner trying to seduce everything in my way... :roll:

Ed

vtflyfish
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Re: where do you fish not a destination....

Post by vtflyfish » Tue Nov 04, 2014 7:43 pm

Why I fish Adirondack ponds, a photo essay:
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Oscar Wilde: Work is the curse of the drinking class.

wiFlyFisher
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Re: where do you fish not a destination....

Post by wiFlyFisher » Tue Nov 04, 2014 11:04 pm

ewpeper wrote:
andre wrote:I can spend hours on one fish and don't move around all that much. Since I fish bamboo I very rarely fish anything but dry flies and maybe a dropper. 90% of actually fishing for me is the rise, landing the fish has little importance, in fact it gets in the way of me fishing to the next rise. I will fish where the fish are but of course wish there was no one else around but maybe a few good friends. (if i have that many) I may sound like a purist but believe me I'm not, if fish were rising in a septic tank I would be the first one there. Hate to leave fish to look for fish so hence not moving if fish are present. Greatly enjoy the beauty, mountains, water around my knees and all that but for me it about the fish or I would just hike. Yes I am an enigma to my self and again maybe a few friends.
Andre
I laughed when I read this, Andre . . . because I could have written it about myself!! Each and every thought of it. (Altho' I'm grateful trout don't rise in septic tanks.)

Example: The first time I ever fished with Gary LaFontaine (ca 1982 or so), we went to the Big Hole. We walked upstream a short distance, and I spotted a riser and pointed it out to Gary. He said "Go for it.", and I started casting. I didn't see him -- not even at a distance -- for another hour (It took me almost that long to get a take.), and by that time Gary was at least 3/4 of a mile above me.

I cannot leave a riser. Gary'd make a couple of casts, and if the fish didn't take he'd move on. From that point on, the only times we ever shared the same water was if we shared a single rod on a small stream or were using a boat. :)

Eric
I would add... You cannot leave a riser even it is a rising to Callibaetis hatching in a bog along the side of the road.. :lol:

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