early midge patterns

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Crepuscular
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early midge patterns

Post by Crepuscular »

Hopefully I can can get some help jump starting my current endeavor of researching early midge fly patterns. The Black Gnat and Griffith's Gnat are a couple patterns that come to mind. Any others that I should be considering?

Eric

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Eperous
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Re: early midge patterns

Post by Eperous »

Eric... if I only had one tiny dry fly, without a doubt my first choice would be a #18 and #20 Dorato Hares Ear for all conditions... I also favor Hans van Klinken's Once and Away Emerger in sizes 18 & 20, more so for Olives than midges... and, if I might be so bold to add a third, I really like #22 and #24 Mahogany Slant-wing CDC emergers for early and late season sipping trout...

I noticed midges about a Garden State ice-lined brook Saturday, but had to resort to "deep plumbing" and a small Conehead Woolly Bugger to get a few lackluster hits and little wild bows...

Good luck tying, Eric! ;)

Ed

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quashnet
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Re: early midge patterns

Post by quashnet »

The 1933 Paul H. Young Co. catalog is the earliest one I have. Young's "Floating Midge" and "Midge Nymph" are shown on the front cover. On page 3 we learn that "The 'Midge' Nymph has not been offered before in America." Hook size to #20, no pattern is given. A tiny, simple line drawing shows a hook with a slim body and a tuft of material behind the eye. On page 5, The P.H.Y. Floating Midge or "No-C-Um" is described as "made with 'cocked' divided wings, finest possible hackle on forged, turned up eye, extra short shank hooks (No. 9523)," to size 20. Patterns are Black Midge, Grizzly Midge, and Dun Midge.
Please visit and bookmark the NEW Paul H. Young Rod Database at phydatabase.com

Crepuscular
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Re: early midge patterns

Post by Crepuscular »

Eperous wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 6:41 pm
Eric... if I only had one tiny dry fly, without a doubt my first choice would be a #18 and #20 Dorato Hares Ear for all conditions... I also favor Hans van Klinken's Once and Away Emerger in sizes 18 & 20, more so for Olives than midges... and, if I might be so bold to add a third, I really like #22 and #24 Mahogany Slant-wing CDC emergers for early and late season sipping trout...

I noticed midges about a Garden State ice-lined brook Saturday, but had to resort to "deep plumbing" and a small Conehead Woolly Bugger to get a few lackluster hits and little wild bows...

Good luck tying, Eric! ;)

Ed
Thanks Ed. I would expect that the cold temps, snow, and subsequent thaw has those freestoners a little chilly! Good to see you are finding some fish!

Crepuscular
Posts: 223
Joined: Sat Oct 18, 2014 12:47 pm

Re: early midge patterns

Post by Crepuscular »

quashnet wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 6:44 pm
The 1933 Paul H. Young Co. catalog is the earliest one I have. Young's "Floating Midge" and "Midge Nymph" are shown on the front cover. On page 3 we learn that "The 'Midge' Nymph has not been offered before in America." Hook size to #20, no pattern is given. A tiny, simple line drawing shows a hook with a slim body and a tuft of material behind the eye. On page 5, The P.H.Y. Floating Midge or "No-C-Um" is described as "made with 'cocked' divided wings, finest possible hackle on forged, turned up eye, extra short shank hooks (No. 9523)," to size 20. Patterns are Black Midge, Grizzly Midge, and Dun Midge.
Bob, thanks so much! Very cool stuff!

ted patlen
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Re: early midge patterns

Post by ted patlen »

Mary Orvis Marbury has "black Midge" listed a few times and I would guess that there are others before her as well.

I cannot dig deeper as I am not home.

Matt Grobert
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Re: early midge patterns

Post by Matt Grobert »

The Smoke Jumper is a great midge pattern that is easy to tie and works great. Just change the color of your thread to change the body color.

Thread, fine gold wire, CDC puff and peacock herl.
IMG_2390(Edited).jpg
IMG_2390(Edited).jpg (52.53 KiB) Viewed 748 times

Crepuscular
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Re: early midge patterns

Post by Crepuscular »

Matt Grobert wrote:
Wed Jan 24, 2018 11:30 pm
The Smoke Jumper is a great midge pattern that is easy to tie and works great. Just change the color of your thread to change the body color.

Thread, fine gold wire, CDC puff and peacock herl.

IMG_2390(Edited).jpg
Thanks Matt. the smoke jumper is a good pattern. And yours is a beauty(as always). Do you know when the pattern was originated? I think it was first tied by Mike Hoiness but I don't know when?

Eric

Crepuscular
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Re: early midge patterns

Post by Crepuscular »

ted patlen wrote:
Wed Jan 24, 2018 9:03 pm
Mary Orvis Marbury has "black Midge" listed a few times and I would guess that there are others before her as well.

I cannot dig deeper as I am not home.
Thanks Ted. Good stuff!

Eric

Theroe
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Re: early midge patterns

Post by Theroe »

quashnet wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 6:44 pm
The 1933 Paul H. Young Co. catalog is the earliest one I have. Young's "Floating Midge" and "Midge Nymph" are shown on the front cover. On page 3 we learn that "The 'Midge' Nymph has not been offered before in America." Hook size to #20, no pattern is given. A tiny, simple line drawing shows a hook with a slim body and a tuft of material behind the eye. On page 5, The P.H.Y. Floating Midge or "No-C-Um" is described as "made with 'cocked' divided wings, finest possible hackle on forged, turned up eye, extra short shank hooks (No. 9523)," to size 20. Patterns are Black Midge, Grizzly Midge, and Dun Midge.
Rick
I really love that description, and the mustang at 9523 hook. I just came across a bunch of them, and intend on putting them to good use. Thanks for the post!
Dana
“Time to go fishing”

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