Light wire hooks

Anything fly tying...
Allan
Posts: 812
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 3:00 pm

Re: Light wire hooks

Post by Allan »

Ted,

I don't know if you've ever seen this happen, although if I were a betting man I'd bet you had, but how many times have you seen someone hook a fish and lift both hands high above the head to fight that fish :?: I've seen this many times and I get a good internal laugh :lol: That's what I meant when I referred to your quote, "we were taught.."keep the rod high!!!!!!!" I know that you were using that phrase as an example of misinformation not as advice. That's also what I was referring to when I spoke about 'uncomfortable'. Agree with all your comments in the last post.

How'd the N fish this year. I didn't get down to it.
Regards,

Allan

redietz
Posts: 1147
Joined: Sat Apr 25, 2009 12:23 am
Location: Central MD

Re: Light wire hooks

Post by redietz »

There is occasionally a point in holding the rod high over your head, and that's if you're trying to pick up slack to get the fish on the reel. I've also had to do it once in while when fishing a 14' leader on a 7' rod (or thereabouts) and the leader/line knot gets hung stuck in the tip-top. Other than those two reasons, it's a ridiculous way to fight a fish.

I've lost more fish this year from straightened hooks than I ever recall doing in the past. I was teaching a tying class sponsored by my TU chapter and ended up with half a dozen or so flies tied on chapter-supplied light wire hooks. I think every one of them ended up bent by fish. In this instance, I think the metallurgy was to blame, but I'm sticking with standard gauge hooks from now on. I'm also beginning to see the advantage of forged hooks.
Bob

catskilljohn
Posts: 4318
Joined: Fri Apr 24, 2009 7:03 am
Location: Yardley,PA- Jeffersonville,NY

Re: Light wire hooks

Post by catskilljohn »

redietz wrote: In this instance, I think the metallurgy was to blame.
I have had hooks that bend while your tying on them. Those are certainly to be avoided, but I do tug on each one before wrapping materials on it. Sometimes you just get a batch that didn't get the full hardening process :roll: CJ
"Gentlemen,remove your hats,this is it"
"This is where the trout was invented?"
"Oh he existed in a crude,primitive form in Waltons England"
"But this is where they painted spots on him and taught him to swim"

major257
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2011 8:54 pm

Re: Light wire hooks

Post by major257 »

In my experience I have found that it is better to let the fish stay on the bottom on the river where there is less current. So putting the rod tip in the air would bring the fish up in the water column creating more resistance on the fish and the hook/tippet combination. By keeping the rod tip down and putting pressure on the fish perpedicular to the current the fish stays on the bottom of the stream bed where there is less current and thus less resistance to the fish/hook/tippet combination. This also keeps the fish in it's comfort zone. Fish tire easily up on the surface fighting the current and want to turn down stream and run giving them the torque advantage over the light wire hooks and tippet we use.

I hope I made sense. This is something I learned from an old timer out on the salmon river chase salmon and steelhead. After I got it through my thick skull and was sick of just watching him land fish I became open to suggestion and started to learn what he was saying rather quickly.

Matt

SgtMajUSMC
Posts: 667
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2011 10:25 pm

Re: Light wire hooks

Post by SgtMajUSMC »

Mustad 94833's are a nice hook to tie on, but I've lost good fish over the past two seasons during the Sulphur hatch, because hooks have bent. The hooks (16's and 18's) bent on 5X (and possibly even 6X) tippets.

The trade off between floatability and strength...trying to dress a sparse pattern that will float well, especially during the dusk to dark transition when you don't want to be tying on a new fly.

Good stuff, that keeps us all coming back for more.

Best,

Tim

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Bud
Posts: 251
Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2009 3:59 pm
Location: Bronxville, NY

Re: Light wire hooks

Post by Bud »

Ken Hanley, one of the pioneers of West Coast near-shore saltwater fly fishing for big, hot pelagic fish, has a name for the hands-over-the head fish-fighting position: "the Orvis pose." Good for catalogue photos, but not so much for fighting fish. "Uh oh," he says when he sees someone do it when hooked up to a skipjack or dorado, "trout guy." :lol:

--Bud
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. And inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.
-- Marx (Groucho)

Allan
Posts: 812
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 3:00 pm

Re: Light wire hooks

Post by Allan »

major257 wrote:In my experience I have found that it is better to let the fish stay on the bottom on the river where there is less current. So putting the rod tip in the air would bring the fish up in the water column creating more resistance on the fish and the hook/tippet combination. By keeping the rod tip down and putting pressure on the fish perpedicular to the current the fish stays on the bottom of the stream bed where there is less current and thus less resistance to the fish/hook/tippet combination. This also keeps the fish in it's comfort zone. Fish tire easily up on the surface fighting the current and want to turn down stream and run giving them the torque advantage over the light wire hooks and tippet we use.

I hope I made sense. This is something I learned from an old timer out on the salmon river chase salmon and steelhead. After I got it through my thick skull and was sick of just watching him land fish I became open to suggestion and started to learn what he was saying rather quickly.

Matt
Matt,

Try getting your hands on the video, "Feeding Lies". In it, trout are vidiotaped in currents and different depths. Viewing the video and seeing where trout appear comfortable and react may alter your opinion of "comfort zone".

Allan

major257
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2011 8:54 pm

Re: Light wire hooks

Post by major257 »

Allan,

I will try to get it when I get home. I can't download video from here.

Matt

Bamboo&Brookies
Posts: 739
Joined: Fri May 08, 2009 4:44 pm

Re: Light wire hooks

Post by Bamboo&Brookies »

I use standard hooks for most part and don't have too much trouble getting solid hookups, especially when using dries.

Sometimes when fish are more tentative -- when they're not really whacking the dries -- I miss some strikes.

And on streamers I get alot of short strikes, but that seems to be the nature of how fish take a streamer -- they slash at it at first and then sometimes come back around.

As far as angle of rod when playing a fish, I do often hold the rod high after striking -- mostly to strip in the slack line and try to keep it from fouling, especially if the fish took the fly at the end of the drift.

Once I get the fish on the reel (assuming it's big enough not to just strip in) then I try to change angles, especially if it's big enough to take a couple runs.

Since I often fish water full of ledges and boulders and chutes, I have to put more more pressure on a trout early to keep them from running under a ledge and breaking me off, or running downstream through the fast water and taking alot of line out.

I find horizontal pressure, keeping the rod parallel to the water, helps persuade a stubborn trout.

Rob
Give a man a fly rod, a shotgun and a bird dog and he'll never be worth a d*mn.
-Old New England saying

ted patlen
Posts: 2021
Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2009 10:03 am

Re: Light wire hooks

Post by ted patlen »

Bamboo&Brookies wrote:I use standard hooks for most part and don't have too much trouble getting solid hookups, especially when using dries.

Sometimes when fish are more tentative -- when they're not really whacking the dries -- I miss some strikes.

And on streamers I get alot of short strikes, but that seems to be the nature of how fish take a streamer -- they slash at it at first and then sometimes come back around.

As far as angle of rod when playing a fish, I do often hold the rod high after striking -- mostly to strip in the slack line and try to keep it from fouling, especially if the fish took the fly at the end of the drift.

Once I get the fish on the reel (assuming it's big enough not to just strip in) then I try to change angles, especially if it's big enough to take a couple runs.

Since I often fish water full of ledges and boulders and chutes, I have to put more more pressure on a trout early to keep them from running under a ledge and breaking me off, or running downstream through the fast water and taking alot of line out.

I find horizontal pressure, keeping the rod parallel to the water, helps persuade a stubborn trout.

Rob
that is what i'm refering to...it doesn't matter where the rod is...it's the angle of the line from the rod

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