The "Cinberg"

From Halford's early dries to the Catskill dry and everything else that floats on the surface.
catskilljohn
Posts: 4313
Joined: Fri Apr 24, 2009 7:03 am
Location: Yardley,PA- Jeffersonville,NY

Re: The "Cinberg"

Post by catskilljohn »

A few from last night...I think I will tie a few of these this weekend at Joe's Partridge Days event at the CFFCM! CJ
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"Gentlemen,remove your hats,this is it"
"This is where the trout was invented?"
"Oh he existed in a crude,primitive form in Waltons England"
"But this is where they painted spots on him and taught him to swim"

Brk Trt
Posts: 122
Joined: Sat Sep 03, 2016 9:23 pm

Re: The "Cinberg"

Post by Brk Trt »

One of these day's I'll learn to get that wood duck to look as great as yours.

Brk Trt

Bishthefish1
Posts: 91
Joined: Fri Oct 31, 2014 10:56 am
Location: North Yorkshire

Re: The "Cinberg"

Post by Bishthefish1 »

Those are beautiful ties CJ and would work very well over here for our spring time hatches of March Browns (Rhithrogena Germanica) and Large Brook Duns (Ecdyonurus Torrentis ). In the spring I use a variety of different Jinglers to cover a range of up wings - best one so far is dark dun hackle tail, muskrat body, dark dun rear hackle collar and snipe under covert front hackle collar tied on # 16 & 18 hooks, it is an excellent imitation for our Iron Blue Duns (Baëtis Niger) which hatches in good numbers over here on my local streams (usually during cold and wet weather).
'Most anglers spend their lives making rules for trout,
and trout spend theirs breaking them'
- George Aston

bearbutt
Posts: 533
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:36 pm

Re: The "Cinberg"

Post by bearbutt »

Great ties, CJ! What did you use for hackle behind the wood duck? Love those old 94840s too!

bb

catskilljohn
Posts: 4313
Joined: Fri Apr 24, 2009 7:03 am
Location: Yardley,PA- Jeffersonville,NY

Re: The "Cinberg"

Post by catskilljohn »

Thanks guys...this fly certainly holds a special place in my heart for a lot of reasons. Bb, it's ginger hackle from Collins Hackle, pretty much all I use on the older patterns. CJ
"Gentlemen,remove your hats,this is it"
"This is where the trout was invented?"
"Oh he existed in a crude,primitive form in Waltons England"
"But this is where they painted spots on him and taught him to swim"

fly_fischa
Posts: 72
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2009 4:33 am

Re: The "Cinberg"

Post by fly_fischa »

I love this Pattern, I'm going to have to give it a go one of these days. You tie them so beautifully CJ :D

Mantis
Posts: 321
Joined: Tue Jun 09, 2009 12:43 pm

Re: The "Cinberg"

Post by Mantis »

Anyone know how Phil is doing. Branst told me he had been having some dementia type problems. Phil: Always the gentleman.

St.Froid
Posts: 225
Joined: Sat Sep 10, 2016 9:14 am
Location: North of Caribou east of the Allagash

Re: The "Cinberg"

Post by St.Froid »

Part of what I find so attractive about this site is the amount of history that resides here; this place fairly wallows in it. The Fly itself is fascinating and gorgeous to look at, ...and intimidating. Perhaps someone could explain, in terms a very average tier can understand, how you go about tying in WD to use as hackle? I've read and reread the thread but I'm a little foggy on the logistics. I love WD but I've attempted to use it in the manner you folks are.

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Barleywine
Posts: 340
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 10:38 am
Location: Wyckoff, NJ

Re: The "Cinberg"

Post by Barleywine »

St. Froid. I agree, the history on this site and of this fly is wonderful.

Try not to be intimidated by this fly. It's a bit tricky to tye the perfect-looking examples that you see posted, but take heart in the knowledge that this fly will catch plenty of fish, even when your wood duck is quite askew. The ones I tye do not look perfect, and I purposely make them very scruffy/shaggy-looking (that's my story and I'm sticking with it). I assume that you have searched the various threads here on the Cinberg, and you've seen CJ's excellent SBS on tying the fly. Here's my two cents worth of advice that I'll add: When you tye in the wood duck, don't cinch your thread too tightly. Leave it just loose enough that you can grab some of those wood duck barbs and move them around the hook shank. Then you tighten the thread to keep them in place. Another suggestion is to not use as much wood duck on your early versions of the fly. Use a section that's about a 1/2 inch wide, and the wood duck will be more manageable. Think of the effectiveness of sparsely-tyed soft-hackles, and you can appreciate that it doesn't take a lot of wood duck to give this fly its magic. When you're fairly happy with the way the flies are turning out, you can increase the amount of wood duck in later tyes.

In short, just jump right in. Even people who have been tying this fly for a while turn out a clunker now and then; it's just the nature of working with the wood duck. But remember, those clunkers are very effective...perhaps even more so.

-Chuck
"The secret to life is honesty and fair dealing. When you can fake that, you've got it made." ---Groucho Marx

St.Froid
Posts: 225
Joined: Sat Sep 10, 2016 9:14 am
Location: North of Caribou east of the Allagash

Re: The "Cinberg"

Post by St.Froid »

Barleywine wrote:St. Froid. I agree, the history on this site and of this fly is wonderful.

Try not to be intimidated by this fly. It's a bit tricky to tye the perfect-looking examples that you see posted, but take heart in the knowledge that this fly will catch plenty of fish, even when your wood duck is quite askew. The ones I tye do not look perfect, and I purposely make them very scruffy/shaggy-looking (that's my story and I'm sticking with it). I assume that you have searched the various threads here on the Cinberg, and you've seen CJ's excellent SBS on tying the fly. Here's my two cents worth of advice that I'll add: When you tye in the wood duck, don't cinch your thread too tightly. Leave it just loose enough that you can grab some of those wood duck barbs and move them around the hook shank. Then you tighten the thread to keep them in place. Another suggestion is to not use as much wood duck on your early versions of the fly. Use a section that's about a 1/2 inch wide, and the wood duck will be more manageable. Think of the effectiveness of sparsely-tyed soft-hackles, and you can appreciate that it doesn't take a lot of wood duck to give this fly its magic. When you're fairly happy with the way the flies are turning out, you can increase the amount of wood duck in later tyes.

In short, just jump right in. Even people who have been tying this fly for a while turn out a clunker now and then; it's just the nature of working with the wood duck. But remember, those clunkers are very effective...perhaps even more so.

-Chuck
Thank you. It gives me a little more confidence in the tying of it to know I wasn't too far 'off message' in my attempts. I appreciate the way you phrased your post, a great read. I've been tying for years but I never even tried to hit the heights I see pictured here; everything came under the heading "It's a fishing fly, dammit!" ...so scruffy it shall be.

When I first started tying the biggest problem I had was with proportions, still can be if I'm not paying attention. I'm not kidding when I say this place makes you want to up your game. Read a thread on any pattern and all the complacency in your tying techniques gets washed away, replaced by those "Aha!" moments that send you scurrying for the bench.

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