The dry flies of John Atherton

From Halford's early dries to the Catskill dry and everything else that floats on the surface.
David S.
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Re: The dry flies of John Atherton

Post by David S. »

catskilljohn wrote:Here is number 7, the ugly sister to the famous 1-6.

This one was a little easier for me to get my head around, with a black tying silk body that required no blending of dubbing, no wondering what shade, or as Mike would say, no pinches of anything. Tyed on a 94836 size 18 hook.

Atherton tyed it in either black or very dark dun, and used it to imitate the very small flies or midges that land on the flat water in evenings. He states it could be tyed with hackle sized to the hook size, or larger. I went for larger as the book plate shows.

I am seeing a sort of similarity with this book and Flicks book, just a little. This fly reminds me of Art's olive imitation, which he states is a small dun variant.

CJ
I don't know about "ugly sister", I think they look very tasty.. Now remains only the question of exactly what brand of black thread Atherton may have been using ;)
Tied in the fashion you have done them they do indeed look quite a bit like Flick's BWO, tied with a shorter hackle they would also look quite a bit like one of Bill Tobin’s "Little People"-flies...
/David S.

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quashnet
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Re: The dry flies of John Atherton

Post by quashnet »

These flies are influenced by Atherton's variant number one and spider number one. On the rivers I often fish, there is a crane fly, genus Bittacomorpha, with a striking black-and-white color pattern. I like to think I am imitating the crane flies but you know I would fish this design anyway, just because it is so much fun. Gold tinsel body on regular hook shank, no body on short shank.

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ewpeper
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Re: The dry flies of John Atherton

Post by ewpeper »

Very nice, Robert. Ya got some quality badger there, and that's a pretty nice looking reel.:-)

Eric
A mountain is a fact -- a trout is a moment of beauty known only to men who seek them.
Al McClane in his Introduction to The Practical Fly Fisherman . . . often erroneously attributed to Arnold Gingrich

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quashnet
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Re: The dry flies of John Atherton

Post by quashnet »

Thank you, Eric. Most of my tying materials were handed down from older guys, and now I'm getting to be an older guy myself. I really enjoy spiders and variants, but got here a little too late for the Art Flick discussion.

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Eperous
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Re: The dry flies of John Atherton

Post by Eperous »

quashnet wrote:These flies are influenced by Atherton's variant number one and spider number one. On the rivers I often fish, there is a crane fly, genus Bittacomorpha, with a striking black-and-white color pattern. I like to think I am imitating the crane flies but you know I would fish this design anyway, just because it is so much fun. Gold tinsel body on regular hook shank, no body on short shank.

Image
Very, very nice... and welcome to SGM... I recognize you from Clark's...

Ed

catskilljohn
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Re: The dry flies of John Atherton

Post by catskilljohn »

Eperous wrote: Very, very nice... and welcome to SGM... I recognize you from Clark's...
Ed
And we are blessed to have him here too! :D CJ
"Gentlemen,remove your hats,this is it"
"This is where the trout was invented?"
"Oh he existed in a crude,primitive form in Waltons England"
"But this is where they painted spots on him and taught him to swim"

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quashnet
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Re: The dry flies of John Atherton

Post by quashnet »

Thank you for the warm welcome. Speaking of warm, the air temperature broke the 60s in southern New England today, and that won't happen again here until March; the thaw is ending. So I got in my first afternoon of fishing in 2013, and because of this forum conversation I fished a variant, which I don't think would have otherwise occurred to me. I had Black Spiders, Grey Fox Variants, and Conovers with me, and used an extended-hackled Conover only because I could see it on the dark surface of the stream. Little native brook trout went wild over it. Great fun! Thanks for the inspiration.

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catskilljohn
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Re: The dry flies of John Atherton

Post by catskilljohn »

Wow, your photo's are even more amazing over here, thats some good stuff Robert, really good stuff!

You tye a marvelous fly my friend, those are awesome. CJ
"Gentlemen,remove your hats,this is it"
"This is where the trout was invented?"
"Oh he existed in a crude,primitive form in Waltons England"
"But this is where they painted spots on him and taught him to swim"

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quashnet
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Re: The dry flies of John Atherton

Post by quashnet »

Aw man, it sure is easier when I don't have to set a divided wing. But thank you.
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catskilljohn
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Re: The dry flies of John Atherton

Post by catskilljohn »

Variant number two: Tups Variant

Atherton states that the hackle color for this fly is "a very unusual color and seldom encountered". I would agree, a pale dun with brassy highlights and faint markings of grizzly would be unusual!

He suggested pale cree, which is what I used here, or a mixture of tan or buff and very light grizzly. Body, short segment of bright yellow silk with tups dubbing in front. Tyed on a #16 94840, Atherton used them in #14's and #16's.

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CJ
"Gentlemen,remove your hats,this is it"
"This is where the trout was invented?"
"Oh he existed in a crude,primitive form in Waltons England"
"But this is where they painted spots on him and taught him to swim"

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