Bucktails or streamers

bearbutt
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Re: Bucktails or streamers

Post by bearbutt »

ted patlen wrote:multiple hook rigs have been with us for years...

two flies, three hooks, single and double trailers, single and treble trailer...

This is true. Usually, my experience is that the multiple rigs involved multiple tippets via tag ends. Or sometimes the process involves tying the trailing fly to the bend of the lead hook--. There are so many variations of the dropper rig, or multiple wet flies--but I haven't seen or or read about anyone doing it with streamers--though I can imagine it's surely been done. If you have any online or printed source for me, I'd love to read it. Probably nothing we do today is original anyhow--the antecedents are in spread throughout history.

When I tie the gang streamers, I tie the heavy mono into the butt of the streamer so that it exits like this:

Image

The mono's about 16 inches long--and to this end gets tied another streamer--. They get stored and carried in an old Hardy cast case so the mono can straighten easily and doesn't get kinked:

Image

I still need to perfect this--lighter mono, smaller flies, maybe less than 16 inches between them--and like I said, it's only for a certain situation--but tinkering around like this is part of the fun.

bb

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Eperous
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Re: Bucktails or streamers

Post by Eperous »

Interesting concept BB... the one small streamer--- lower right hand of your circular tin in the bottom photo, looks a bit like a Hewitt Neversink streamer... short, black body, maybe a badger saddle wing, jungle cock, perhaps a red hackle throat? :?:

Ed

ted patlen
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Re: Bucktails or streamers

Post by ted patlen »

bb,

I don't have anything in print, except the Bergman exert, in which I can give for research but how about first hand knowledge?

My dad was a very good fisherman , didn't use flies 100% of the time, but always used what he called nymphs as a dropper when fishing bait.
He loved fishing streamers and usually fished them by two, similar to how you rig your flies. One was a dropper about 18" above the point fly. The dropper was almost always a white maribou and the point was usually a male dace, golden darter or silver darter, all Oatman patterns. He especially loved fishing these in the Esopus. He swore that the trout would see the big white streamer then take the smaller natural looking fly following from behind.

I used to fish two wooly buggers in the same way. In heavily fished waters these very different concoctions thrown over theses supposedly smarter fish do at times rile them up. Another possible problem solver to try when the fish don't really want to play.

ted

bearbutt
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Re: Bucktails or streamers

Post by bearbutt »

[quote="ted patlen"] The dropper was almost always a white maribou and the point was usually a male dace, golden darter or silver darter, all Oatman patterns. He especially loved fishing these in the Esopus. He swore that the trout would see the big white streamer then take the smaller natural looking fly following from behind. /quote]

Ted, thanks, this story about your dad nails it all. A lot of fly fishing history is oral history, so we don't see it in print even though we know it's out there. It would be good to have a page somewhere here on the site to tell these stories, and post interviews, and stuff like that before it's all lost.

Ed, I'm afraid I've never seen a Hewitt streamer and would love to see a photo if you have one you could post. All I have read is the description Hewitt wrote in his "Angling Specialties" catalogue. I'm not sure who might have one--AMFF, maybe? CMFF? Anyone know? The streamers in the Hardy cast box are flatwings about 3 inches long--using grizzly rather than badger hackle. Too big for the the purpose of ganging--I'll try smaller ones next season, 1 1/2 inches maybe.

bb

Theroe
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Re: Bucktails or streamers

Post by Theroe »

Depending on geography: on Cape Cod where I fish ALOT for stripers(some tuna blues, salters etc) a buck tail is a pretty much jig. Or a treble with buck tail & red tag added to a lure, usually the Atom striper swiped.
A streamer is a streamer until you add bucktail - then it's a buck tail streamer.

Hairwing Salmon flies are never buck tails - anywhere.
In Roscoe, where I fish a real lot flies go by name: Mickey Finn, picket pin, etc, not description.

Ditto for Pennsylvania. Exception: Clouser minnow!

It's different everywhere.......
“Time to go fishing”

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quashnet
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Re: Bucktails or streamers

Post by quashnet »

This Hewitt Neversink Streamer, from the collection of the American Museum of Fly Fishing...

Image

...is discussed in this thread:

viewtopic.php?t=1132

Unfortunately the fly was placed on a white background, so that much of the badger feather disappears from view. A poor black-and-white photo of the same fly is printed on page 150 of Paul Schullery's American Fly Fishing: A History (1987), from which one can get some sense of the fly's overall light-and-dark appearance. many years ago, when John Merwin was the museum director, I was allowed to examine this fly side by side with a Blacknose Dace tied by Art Flick. I considered one fly to be a streamer, and the other a bucktail; both allowed materials to extend far beyond the bend of the hook.
Please visit and bookmark the NEW Paul H. Young Rod Database at phydatabase.com

bearbutt
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Re: Bucktails or streamers

Post by bearbutt »

Quash, thanks for the photo of the Neversink streamer, and also the link to the previous discussion about it. Hewitt was sometimes secretive about how his patterns were tied--one thinks of Louis Rhead in this regard--but his catalogues give generally clear descriptions of the flies. His 1937 catalogue describes the Neversink Streamer in the following way:

Image

13 & 14 hooks?--pretty small as streamers go, though the wings are quite long.

bb
Last edited by bearbutt on Tue Dec 20, 2016 10:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Eperous
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Re: Bucktails or streamers

Post by Eperous »

bearbutt wrote: ... I'm afraid I've never seen a Hewitt streamer and would love to see a photo if you have one you could post. ...
BB, I forgot you ask about Hewitt's Neversink Streamer... it's here: viewtopic.php?f=5&t=410&hilit=neversink+hewitt

Details were provided by the American Museum of Flyfishing in Manchester, VT after I read about it in a Paul Schullery book.

Oops... I see a couple posts above on this, and you have an answer... :oops:

Ed

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