Rotary vises, plus

Anything fly tying...
cwfly
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2017 7:09 pm

Re: Rotary vises, plus

Post by cwfly »

I started in the last half of the 1950's with a Noll kit, incorporating feathers from a parakeet. I will never forget that the first fly I tied, and it took a long time, was backward.
Later, and after a break of some time, moved on to a Thompson and then to a Dyna-King Barracuda (clamp not pedestal).
Now I use that and a Thomas, also a C clamp. The Thomas will hold anything and its simplicity means nothing gets in the way of my clumsy fingers. I use the Dyna-King, with the midge jaws for little fellows and I do not use it as a rotary vise. I will frequently rotate it to see what's going on underneath and on the back side but I still wind material the old-fashioned way. I still, almost always, whip finish with my hands and not with a tool except on midges. I learned the whip finishing from Helen Shaw's book and with some assistance from the late Ed Hawley who supervised the tackle department at Stoddard's in Boston back in the 60's and 70's when I would frequent that shop since I was stationed in Boston and elsewhere in New England in the Navy.
Charlie

catskilljohn
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Location: Yardley,PA- Jeffersonville,NY

Re: Rotary vises, plus

Post by catskilljohn »

Great thread here, lots of good advise and experience!

Its amazing how our tools are so different. If I had to keep only one, it would be the old Thompson. I love it because it's a classic design, it's simple and comfortable. Years ago I used to put a lot of thought into the vise, and I bought a bunch of them. Cheap, costly, simple and complicated, I had every style.

Now I don't even think about it, unless it squeaks. I keep one upstate and one here, it's easy to replace if something would go bad, and I'm so used to using it.

I love hearing everyone's vise stories!

ps...Walt, any chance you make a trip back to Roscoe??? Please???
"Gentlemen,remove your hats,this is it"
"This is where the trout was invented?"
"Oh he existed in a crude,primitive form in Waltons England"
"But this is where they painted spots on him and taught him to swim"

Crepuscular
Posts: 223
Joined: Sat Oct 18, 2014 12:47 pm

Re: Rotary vises, plus

Post by Crepuscular »

I own a rotary vice, and it rotates real nice so that I can see the fly from all sides... 8-)

The only time I ever use it as I suppose it was designed to be used for "rotary tying", is when I wrap flat tinsel on streamers, for some reason, I get a more even spacing of the tinsel when I use the rotary capability. I'm still not really happy with how my streamers turn out, but that's another thread...
Last edited by Crepuscular on Sun Mar 19, 2017 3:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

reservoirman
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Location: connecticut
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Re: Rotary vises, plus

Post by reservoirman »

You know I've thought about buying a new vise every now and then but their so expensive that I keep talking myself out of it Although a rotary vise has some nice features,I still tye with an old Thompson a vice that I bought sometime in the 70's.It has 2 sizes one for smaller flies and one for larger it works just fine and if you leave it loose you can spin it to see the other side of the fly.Theirs always one for sale on ebay and look there when I need a part I'm gonna save my money for some good dry fly hackle. Stan

catskilljohn
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Location: Yardley,PA- Jeffersonville,NY

Re: Rotary vises, plus

Post by catskilljohn »

reservoirman wrote: it works just fine and if you leave it loose you can spin it to see the other side of the fly. Stan
I do that exact thing, but I put a rubber "O" ring at the point where the stem meets the body, it's snug but you can rotate it 90* in both directions to look underneath. CJ
"Gentlemen,remove your hats,this is it"
"This is where the trout was invented?"
"Oh he existed in a crude,primitive form in Waltons England"
"But this is where they painted spots on him and taught him to swim"

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the wolf88
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Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 10:22 pm

Re: Rotary vises, plus

Post by the wolf88 »

I started on the classic vise which was the Thomas "sunrise" model.. best one ever had. I still got it and keep as a backup.. I use the hmh vise with base . Like walt had said.. good vise for inspection of workmanship and wrapping hard materials easier. the hmh vise, I brought it was under a 120 bucks, now its nutty to buy one :shock:

reservoirman
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Location: connecticut
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Re: Rotary vises, plus

Post by reservoirman »

You know CJ that's a great idea about the o ring as it is a trifle loose when you keep it like that the o ring is just the ticketThanks for the idea.Stan

Zak
Posts: 14
Joined: Thu Jun 15, 2017 11:56 pm

Re: Rotary vises, plus

Post by Zak »

I'm pretty new at tying, but I'm really happy with my Peak vise (@$140). The only real use I make of the true rotary is applying materials to the underside (throats and Clousers) and for wooly buggers, on which I wrap the body forward, the hackle back, and wire forward to lock the feather down. The spin works great for all three parts of that.

bearbutt
Posts: 533
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:36 pm

Re: Rotary vises, plus

Post by bearbutt »

So many people started out on a Thompson--and you know how it is, the memory of the first vise--and first vice.

I started out on a rotary in 1973. A Universal rotary. They were made in Westfield, Mass., and I grew up in western Mass and fished the Westfield--and Farmington, and Swift. It was the local company--so why not?

My go-to vise at home is now a Regal with the rotation head. Not rotary. It does the job for when I need to see the back side, when laying down wingsets, or trimming deer hair (Muddlers, Stimulators, and so on).

But when I travel, I take my little old Universal rotary--it's made of aluminum, light, folds compactly--nothing fancy about it. The big round rotation arm reminds me of the arm on my mother's Necchi sewing machine. But for a period in the 60s and early 70s, it was a vise of some reknown--if you look through Valla's Founding Flies you can see a lot of names tying on the vise--Helen Shaw, Lew Oatman, Keith Fulsher.

I'm using it now at the cabin in the Adirondacks:

Image

The fly is a big dun stimulator that I use for the stoneflies on the Ausable. The rotary feature really helps a lot when trimming the elk hair up near the eye. You can't tie these too big or too bushy, it seems--the big browns just gobble them up.

bb

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Eperous
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Location: Catskills

Re: Rotary vises, plus

Post by Eperous »

bearbutt wrote:So many people started out on a Thompson--and you know how it is, the memory of the first vise--and first vice.

I started out on a rotary in 1973. A Universal rotary. They were made in Westfield, Mass., and I grew up in western Mass and fished the Westfield--and Farmington, and Swift. It was the local company--so why not?

My go-to vise at home is now a Regal with the rotation head. Not rotary. It does the job for when I need to see the back side, when laying down wingsets, or trimming deer hair (Muddlers, Stimulators, and so on).

But when I travel, I take my little old Universal rotary--it's made of aluminum, light, folds compactly--nothing fancy about it. The big round rotation arm reminds me of the arm on my mother's Necchi sewing machine. But for a period in the 60s and early 70s, it was a vise of some reknown--if you look through Valla's Founding Flies you can see a lot of names tying on the vise--Helen Shaw, Lew Oatman, Keith Fulsher.

I'm using it now at the cabin in the Adirondacks:

Image

The fly is a big dun stimulator that I use for the stoneflies on the Ausable. The rotary feature really helps a lot when trimming the elk hair up near the eye. You can't tie these too big or too bushy, it seems--the big browns just gobble them up.

bb


;)

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