Catskill cannonball step-by-step

Some call them Bottom Dredgers. They are too often over shadowed by the dry fly, but have their place here.
Theroe
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Re: Catskill cannonball step-by-step

Post by Theroe »

Nice post John.....although you had me going there for a minute with the “hung Partridge”...... :lol:
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tie2fish
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Re: Catskill cannonball step-by-step

Post by tie2fish »

Theroe wrote:
Tue Nov 14, 2017 12:56 pm
Nice post John.....although you had me going there for a minute with the “hung Partridge”...... :lol:
Takes them a while to get off the ground ... ;)

Theroe
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Re: Catskill cannonball step-by-step

Post by Theroe »

tie2fish wrote:
Wed Nov 15, 2017 9:25 am
Theroe wrote:
Tue Nov 14, 2017 12:56 pm
Nice post John.....although you had me going there for a minute with the “hung Partridge”...... :lol:
Takes them a while to get off the ground ... ;)
Lmao - that’s good Bill!
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wiFlyFisher
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Re: Catskill cannonball step-by-step

Post by wiFlyFisher »

CJ, are you using the Czech coiled indicator leader????

Image

Theroe
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Re: Catskill cannonball step-by-step

Post by Theroe »

that would be a French / Spanish type....... in the early 1980's I fished up in the Pyrenees mountains. Some of them used a piece of multi colored salt water monofilament as a strike indicator. They wrapped a 5' section around a pencil, then put it in a warm overnight, and let it cool the next day. It was similar to a brand of mono still sold today, although the name escapes me. Very similar to the one pictured in this post.
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wiFlyFisher
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Re: Catskill cannonball step-by-step

Post by wiFlyFisher »

Theroe wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 8:56 am
that would be a French / Spanish type....... in the early 1980's I fished up in the Pyrenees mountains. Some of them used a piece of multi colored salt water monofilament as a strike indicator. They wrapped a 5' section around a pencil, then put it in a warm overnight, and let it cool the next day. It was similar to a brand of mono still sold today, although the name escapes me. Very similar to the one pictured in this post.
Yes, I have seen them advertised before.... https://competitiveangler.com/shop/line ... indicator/

I wanted to find out from CJ how he used it and how well it worked for him. He answered me in detailed PM. Fishing tiny nymphs under the surface are impossible to see and I prefer not using it as a dropper fly off the a$$ end of a larger fly if possible.

Theroe
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Re: Catskill cannonball step-by-step

Post by Theroe »

Somewhere years ago I learned to put three drops of red nail polish on the bottom of my leader butt-that’s what I use as a strike indicator when nymphing in tough conditions ...... anything else I watch where the leader meets the water ...
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Algyros
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Re: Catskill cannonball step-by-step

Post by Algyros »

The red nail polish is an interesting idea. Could you tell me if you put the three drops on the leader/line junction or where the butt section is joined to the rest of the leader?

I do something similar with the smallest orange Lightning Strike ball indicator. These indicators are too small to float anything, but the make nice sighters and they can be attached to the leader so that they're adjustable.

Finally, I used coiled sighters for a while a few years ago, but then abandoned the idea. I'd love to hear CJ's thoughts on using them.

Alex

wiFlyFisher
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Re: Catskill cannonball step-by-step

Post by wiFlyFisher »

When out West in slightly rippled water during the morning Tricos I can't see my leader nor my tiny fly and the casts are fairly long or you will spook the trout. Even when I see the bulge it may not be taking my fly.

catskilljohn
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Re: Catskill cannonball step-by-step

Post by catskilljohn »

Algyros wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:15 am

Finally, I used coiled sighters for a while a few years ago, but then abandoned the idea. I'd love to hear CJ's thoughts on using them.

Alex
Alex,

I gave them a good trial this past summer, as I wrote to Johnny, and during that time I used them with many combos of flies and in various conditions.

I dislike floating indicators in general, especially thingamobobbers and giant puffs of yarn. Most of my choices on rigging are tailored to smaller streams, and there are so few deep runs on the little freestones anyway, a bobber doesn’t do well for me.

I used the coiled sighters in high water and low water with nymphs of all sizes, and found that I really only gained an advantage in low summer conditions when fishing tiny nymphs long distances. They are very easy to see, cast well and parachute down to the surface lightly and slowly, allowing the nymph to touch down early and sink before the sighter hits the surface.

The thing I dislike about them is you have no contact feel at all, it becomes totally visual. You don’t feel takes or rocks, or anything.

What I do like about them is they are super sensitive, any drag whatsoever is telegraphed to the sighter and it opens and closes when the flies are touching bottom. Like I mentioned to John, it is exciting to see one straighten out from a distance when a trout takes!

However, they are a bit finicky, and don’t go through the guides easily, even the small ones I make with 1/8” brass tubes. Boiled in water and then frozen, they are around 1/4” in diameter unwound.

My main sighter is made with multiple colored mono, 5 or 6 different colors knotted together in 8” sections, but I use it for a depth gauge more than a strike indicator.

Hope this was helpful, if you want I’ll send you a couple to try. Let me know. CJ
"Gentlemen,remove your hats,this is it"
"This is where the trout was invented?"
"Oh he existed in a crude,primitive form in Waltons England"
"But this is where they painted spots on him and taught him to swim"

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