guilty of corruption

From Halford's early dries to the Catskill dry and everything else that floats on the surface.
Roy
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2010 12:38 pm

guilty of corruption

Post by Roy »

I love dry flies,
love Catskill dries, they have impressed me as works of art and beauty for over forty years.
One of my favourite materials is lemon woodduck flank.

Some of you may have heard of me, I mess around with design.

This is a variant of Skues orange Quill, a fly he enjoyed when fishing the BWO (Ephemerella) hatches on his beloved Itchen in Hampshire UK.
Am I allowed to corrupt this fine fly thus?

Image


regards,
Roy Christie

viking
Posts: 213
Joined: Fri Aug 21, 2009 6:28 am
Location: Sweden

Re: guilty of corruption

Post by viking »

Love your fly Roy.
Caught some nice graylings, on the flies you gave me, this summer.
//Janne

User avatar
Eperous
Posts: 5168
Joined: Thu Jan 07, 2010 3:20 pm
Location: Catskills

Re: guilty of corruption

Post by Eperous »

Hi Roy, WELCOME.... Of course many of us heard of you, and if I could tie as nice as you -- I wouldn't worry about "corruption"... ;)

Ed

Roy
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2010 12:38 pm

Re: guilty of corruption

Post by Roy »

thanks guys.
glad to hear they work, Janne

catskilljohn
Posts: 4318
Joined: Fri Apr 24, 2009 7:03 am
Location: Yardley,PA- Jeffersonville,NY

Re: guilty of corruption

Post by catskilljohn »

You know what I love about your flies? They are the dog-gonest most impressionistic flies I have ever seen. Beautiful! CJ
"Gentlemen,remove your hats,this is it"
"This is where the trout was invented?"
"Oh he existed in a crude,primitive form in Waltons England"
"But this is where they painted spots on him and taught him to swim"

Bamboo&Brookies
Posts: 739
Joined: Fri May 08, 2009 4:44 pm

Re: guilty of corruption

Post by Bamboo&Brookies »

Sweet looking tie, Roy.

Care to offer up the dressing.

Curious -- what do you reckon is the advantage of the 'hook-up' (i.e., 'Waterwisp') style?

Maybe it appears more natural to trout, since the hook may not be as visible (although refraction can do strange things).

Do you find the fly to alight on the water and float well... often, with regular hook-down flies, the bend/gape/point acts as a keel and rudder, helping the fly to light properly on the water and keeping it upright.

Any difference as far as hooking ability/missed takes.

Many thanks... great tie and I would love to give it a shot this winter, which is bearing down upon us with vigor.

Rob
Give a man a fly rod, a shotgun and a bird dog and he'll never be worth a d*mn.
-Old New England saying

Roy
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2010 12:38 pm

Re: guilty of corruption

Post by Roy »

Bamboo&Brookies wrote:Sweet looking tie, Roy.

Care to offer up the dressing.

Curious -- what do you reckon is the advantage of the 'hook-up' (i.e., 'Waterwisp') style?

Maybe it appears more natural to trout, since the hook may not be as visible (although refraction can do strange things).

Do you find the fly to alight on the water and float well... often, with regular hook-down flies, the bend/gape/point acts as a keel and rudder, helping the fly to light properly on the water and keeping it upright.

Any difference as far as hooking ability/missed takes.

Many thanks... great tie and I would love to give it a shot this winter, which is bearing down upon us with vigor.

Rob
Hi Rob,
This design was published on FAOL a few years ago as a step by step.
Now I stopped using polyprop for wings, prefer to omit them, sometimes add them...
http://www.flyanglersonline.com/flytyin ... 04fotw.php
Use whatever recipe suits your fishes.

That one is
K14St Partridge hook #18 (equivalent Redditch 15)
Hot orange thread
grey dun tails
stripped peacock quill dyed orange abdomen
Wing is woodduck
hackle is home dyed silver badger tinted golden olive/orange
Thorax cover (under the fly) is orange pheasant tail fibres, lacquered or acrylic
Thorax, a wee pinch of orange/olive dubbing, seal

Now, the Waterwisp is totally different and its reputation as a bad hooker is due to its having tails and sitting too high in the water, causing brushoffs, I abandoned that idea in the 1970's.
The original of this type of fly, my Avon Special Emerger published in Fly Dressers Guild 1985 works as it is a surface emerger without tails.
just thought that wee bit of history had to be cleared out of the way.
I do have copy.

Going back to the question, I want to use the hook upward presentation so that there is no keel and the fly will behave like a natural, facing the wind and drifting with it. It is also a good weedless fly.
For times when I want a static surface fly I use a reversed parachute emerger.

The EasyPeasyUSD which is what this point-up fly of mine is called is tied in virtually the same manner as a Montana Nymph, just make it subtle and skinny and tie it round the bend with long tails; wing optional.
I finish the fly then run the hackle over my thumbnail to curl it away from the water so there are no hackle barbs penetrating the film.
It will land right and sit/ride right so long as the hackle is not too small.
An overdressed wing will stop hookups as will a heavy hackle.
Splitting the hackle to each side gives the hackle a strong platform, using minimal hackle and an excellent footprint
Fish it upstream roll casting it along on tiny and small streams. On larger and wadeable rivers, I sometimes cast up and across, allow it to drift, let it pass on downstream and then as it would start to drag, lift the rod and play egglayer. This is a mad tactic if there is a good Green Drake hatch/spinner happening. :twisted:

As to hook ups the latter tactic is least likely to succeed, of course but fun
I have had a wee seven incher from the burn at home on a size #24, upstream.
In Danica hatches I use a #10 or #8.
Give them time to turn down and the truttas will attach firmly.

Looking at the design, I have moved the centre of gravity to somewhere on the outside of the gape, just aft of the thorax.
It should land butt first - just - the tippet will anchor it on the film.
It should appear like a natural, the body should stand just clear of the water, fly on tiptoes.
The tippet keeps in on the surface, I degrease the tippet.
The fly is waterproofed in old recipe Supafloat
The two or three spikes of hackle over the hook eye stop the fly from nosediving through the film.
If the trout sees the hook bend I hope he interpret it as a wing edge
Make sure some hackle fibers point rearward also and you have a good supporting footprint that will not tip backwards with a light strong hook.


Thanks for the kind words.
Have a good weekend.

Roy
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2010 12:38 pm

Re: guilty of corruption

Post by Roy »

I'm tryin' CJ, I'm tryin' real hard...


:)
Thanks,
Roy

dennis
Posts: 827
Joined: Fri Apr 24, 2009 10:37 am
Location: Ohio

Re: guilty of corruption

Post by dennis »

Roy, great looking fly and fantastic thread. I remember tying the USD Paraduns when Clark and Goddard came out with " The Trout and the Fly a new Approach" in 1970. With the loop of nylon which the Para hackle was wound they were to difficult to tye so I forgot all about them for awhile. Pryer to that it says in the book that Hal Janssen from America published in 1973 on a fly he invented called "The Stalker". Practically the same as the USA Paradun by Goddard. Does anyone remember this fly :?: I bet you Mr. Valla knows what I'm talking about ;) Anyway after seeing and reading your piece here I am going to tye a couple and see how they work, they won't look as great as yours Roy but close enough to fool the trouts next spring. :lol: Dennis

Roy
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2010 12:38 pm

Re: guilty of corruption

Post by Roy »

Half a dozen turns of Mr Collins hackle will make a fine fly,
Hackle length aboput 1.5 times gape
Enjoy
I don't remember the Stalker but it is there for sure, reported in Datus Proper, I could find the ref.
cheers,
Roy

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